Evan Merkhofer

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Genomics at Mount Saint Mary College

Course Overview

This course will investigate the concepts and techniques used in genetics and molecular biology, including those that are modern and cutting edge.  Textbooks, primary literature, and popular news articles will be used to discuss topics such as chromatin, epigenetics, RNA processing, and the regulation of gene expression.  Focus will be on the fundamental concepts of these areas, including important experimental technologies involved in their investigation, as well as how these topics impact health and disease.  Students will read primary articles, discuss and present these articles in a journal club format.  In the laboratory, students will perform in silico genomics research through participation in an authentic research experience through the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), as well as carry out inquiry based wet lab experiments.

 

Lecture hours: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; Credits: (4)

Prerequisites:  C or better in Bio2040 Genetics

Implementation

Semester Lab Project

The lab experience for the molecular biology course is going to be a semester-long project that will have dry lab (computer) and wet lab components. We will start the course by using computer-based applications in the analysis of genomic DNA (commonly referred to as genome annotation). Subsequently, each group will design and carry out experiments to determine whether there is any evidence that would support their computer based conclusions. This second part will use many of the common techniques in the field of molecular biology, including techniques you may have used in microbiology.

 The Genomics Education Partnership (GEP)

The field of modern genetics is generating data (particularly genomic sequence data) faster than it can be analyzed. Computers are used to make a first pass at annotation of the genomic sequence; that is, indication of the regions of interest – particularly genes. However the computers are prone to mistakes – generally in order to make sure that they do not miss potential genes they predict genes where none exist.  As part of a nationwide consortium of researchers, you will use tools, such as BLAST, FLYBASE and GeneFinder to annotate at least one contig of genomic DNA from Drosophila ficusphila, a species of Drosophia similar to melanogaster but has not had its genome annotated.  We will work as part of a larger research group that is annotating genomic sequence data, looking at the computer predictions and determining if there is sufficient evidence to support the gene predictions. The annotation that we generate will be subsequently made available to the research community, so is a part of an actual research project.  The findings in this report will be used for research publication on which students will be eligible to be co-authors, and the sequences will be submitted to the internationally used GENBANK database.  This component of the course will involve tutorials, homework assignments, a written report, oral presentation and presentation at the spring iROC poster session.

 Investigating the Validity of our Gene Models

During the second part of the semester each group will pick one of their gene models and determine if there is any evidence to support the gene model. We will use a variety of techniques that arecommon tools of the molecular biologist, including RNA isolation, PCR, electrophoresis and restriction digestion.

Lessons Learned and Future Plans

I have implemented the GEP twice as of this update (June 2017), both with success.  Things that I changed upon the second implementation of the GEP (spring 2017 semester):

- Using an online lab notebook.  Since the GEP project involves documenting many aspects of computer generated-data, I have designed a Google Sites-based Wiki page for students to provide documentation supporting their gene models and uploading files.  This system streamlined the lab notebooks greatly, as I was able to access students' lab notebooks at any time.  I would be happy to provide this template to any GEP faculty.

- Difficulty of the contigs.  This year I chose contigs of higher difficulty level than in the previous year.  While this led to the students annotating less contigs than in previous iterations of the course, I feel that the students learned more about gene structure and genomic organization with these more difficult contigs (and they were able to see how topics in lecture directly correlated to annotation).

- Transcription start sites.  This year each pair of students annotated the TSS of one gene.  We were unable to start this part of the project until the last few weeks of the semester, in the future I would like to have the students work on TSS and gene annotation concurrenty.

- Validation of splice site predictions.  This year I implemented a project to verify the splice sites of a gene annnotated by the students.  D. ficusphila was purchased and cultures expanded until each pair of students could isolate RNA, make cDNA, design primers, amplify the cDNA region, perform Sanger sequencing and analyze the results.  Due expected issues with amplification, only about half of the groups were able to both amplify a an amplicon that gave quality sequencing.  This gave students a good understanding of how true research works (or oftentimes doesn't work).

In the future, I would implement the GEP in much the same way, with giving more time for transcriptional start site analysis and troubleshooting the wet-lab validation of splice site predicitions a little more.

Syllabus for Bio3520: Molecular Biology and Genomics

Mount Saint Mary College

Newburgh, New York 12550

 

Biology 3520 – Molecular Biology and Genomics                                       Spring 2017           

'Instructor:  Dr. Evan Merkhofer                                       Lecture MWF'10:10-11:05 AM

Email:  evan.merkhofer@msmc.edu                               Lab Tues/Thurs 12:45-3:45 PM         

Office Hours M 2-4 PM, W 1-3 PM                                              'Phone: 845-569-3369'                                                

And by appointment                                                                                                                         

 

Welcome to BIO3520 – Molecular Biology and Genomics!  

This course will investigate the concepts and techniques used in genetics and molecular biology, including those that are modern and cutting edge.  Textbooks, primary literature, and popular news articles will be used to discuss topics such as chromatin, epigenetics, RNA processing, and the regulation of gene expression.  Focus will be on the fundamental concepts of these areas, including important experimental technologies involved in their investigation, as well as how these topics impact health and disease.  Students will read primary articles, discuss and present these articles in a journal club format.  In the laboratory, students will perform in silico genomics research through participation in an authentic research experience through the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), as well as carry out inquiry based wet lab experiments.

 

Lecture hours: 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab; Credits: (4)

Prerequisites:  C or better in Bio2040 Genetics 

 

Course Learning Objectives:

1.  Develop an understanding and appreciation for the different ways in which regulation of gene expression occurs, and how it is influenced by gene structure, chromatin and epigenetics.  Understand the different aspects of RNA processing, how they affect gene expression and the role they play in disease.

 

2.  Be familiar with technologies used in genetics and molecular biology, and how these have contributed to the body of knowledge in the fields of genetics and molecular biology.  Understand the application of different technologies in research and medicine.

 

3.  Understand the how different types of non-coding RNAs influence gene expression and how non-coding RNAs can be utilized in the treatment of disease.  


4.  Understand the different properties that define a stem cell and how epigenetic mechanisms affect the state of a stem cell.

 

5.  Become proficient at reading, evaluating and analyzing primary and secondary literature articles in the fields of genetics and molecular biology.  Develop an understanding of experimental approach, and the methods utilized in this approach, that is used to reveal insights about biological processes.  Develop skill in communicating this understanding to others.

 

6.  Participate in a genomics based research project that will result in:

  a) An understanding of the structure of eukaryotic genomes across different species

  b) Generation of data to be used for publication with the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP)

       consortium

 

7. Design and implement a wet-lab project to validate predictions made using molecular biology techniques.

 

 

Materials:

  • There is no required textbook for this class.  All readings (online textbooks, scientific literature, popular press articles) will be posted on eClass.  Students interested in having a textbook as a reference may purchase “Molecular Cell Biology” by Lodish et al.  The current edition of this book is the 8th edition, earlier editions are available at discounted rates online.  Dr. Merk always has textbooks available in his office as a reference for any student who would like to use them. 
  • Students are required to purchase “The Gene: An Intimate History” by Siddhartha Mukherjee.  Throughout the semester students will parts of this book and engage in a discussion about important issues on genetics and molecular biology.  This book is available through the bookstore, or you may purchase through an outside vendor.
  • Laptop/Computer – A large portion of this course will require the use of a computer.  If you have a laptop, I highly recommend you bring it to class each week for use on GEP activities.  If you do not have a laptop, you will be able to utilize a departmental laptop during class.  Parts of this class will require the use of a computer outside of class as well.  The laboratory notebook in this class will be fully online.

 

'Attendance Policy':  Students are expected to attend all classes and lab sessions.  Absence from lecture will result in the student missing important lecture material.  Furthermore, this is a small class and therefore all students are expected to be actively involved in the learning process; ­­­­5% of the overall grade will be class participation.  Therefore, it is in your best interest to attend all classes.  If you are unable to attend a class, please contact the instructor as early as possible.  You are responsible for any missed work due to absence. 

There may also be periodic in-class quizzes.  Students will receive a zero for any missed work for which no excuse has been provided.  Absence from an exam is excusable only on the presentation of a certified excuse.  In the case of a makeup exam, and oral examination may be offered.  In the lab, students will be working on a project that builds upon itself through the semester.  Therefore, absence from lab will result in students falling behind.  Absence from lab is allowed only with a valid excuse.

 

Contacting the Instruc'tor': As the instructor of this course, I feel the ability of you as the student to interact with me as needed is a crucial aspect to your success in this course. I enjoy teaching and I enjoy talking with you. If you have questions or just want to explore an idea, I encourage you to come by my office.  I will do everything within my power to always be available during my office hours, although sometimes important meetings are scheduled at that time without my consent. If I am not available during office hours, I will do my best to be available at another time. I also employ an open door policy: if you come by my office and my door is open, please feel free to pop in and ask any questions and I will do my best to answer them.

 

Expectations:  It is my hope that this class will be a positive and enjoyable experience for you.  My expectations of you as the student involve the following:

 

  • Completion of the readings and assignments. Due to the nature of this course, there are a lot of readings and they are of different types.  The readings and assignments for this class are designed to enhance your learning and your completion of these are critical for your success as a student.  Please complete these readings before lecture to best increase your chance of success.
  • Attendance of class.  I expect that you will make every effort to attend class, however, rare unforeseen circumstances may arise that may require your missing class.  If this occurs, it is your responsibility to obtain the information that you missed.
  • Participation.  Your participation in class is an essential part of your success in this class.  The activities in class are designed to enhance your understanding of the subject material.

 

 

As the instructor, you can expect me to:

 

  • Be prepared to engage with you as the student each and every class.
  • Prepare the course and alter this plan as needed.  I believe in learning-centered curriculum, and I will do everything I can to tailor the curriculum of this class to fit all the students’ needs.
  • Give you feedback on your ideas and assignments
  • Treat you, as adult learners, with the utmost respect.

 

 

Teaching Strategies and Class participation:  I strongly encourage students to ask questions in class.  Framing questions is part of the learning process, and your questions help me to see how well you, as the student, understand the topic.  I encourage students to ask questions during lecture and I will always do my best to make sure that the lecture is a comfortable place to ask questions.  During class, I will utilize a number of different techniques to enhance your learning.  These may include readings from textbooks, journal articles and popular literature, PowerPoint presentations, peer interaction and discussion, group discussions and projects, and writing assignments.  If you feel any of these techniques present a problem for you, please contact me.  Furthermore, I strongly urge you to contact me if you feel there is a learning style that works for you that is not being utilized.  Students will be expected to complete reading and writing assignments in a timely fashion, think about the material they are assigned to read, become active participants in classroom.  In this class, collaborative learning will be promoted. Students will be encouraged to form learning groups.  Emphasis will be placed on problem solving and critical thinking.  In doing science, each student will construct a body of knowledge that will support learning in other science courses as well as in other disciplines. This course will emphasize the acquisition of specific skills that include listening and hearing, writing and speaking effectively, critiquing, problem solving, and evaluating data.

 

Course Schedule:  The schedule provided in this syllabus is a tentative schedule.  The specific topics covered may change as the course progresses.  Make sure to check the eClass site for any changes, as well as specific information regarding readings and assignments. 

 

Office Hours:  Office hours are Monday 2:00-4:00 PM and Wednesday 1:00-3:00 pm in Aquinas 250.  I understand that these times may not work for every student.  Therefore, I will do my best to meet with students at other times.  Please contact Dr. Merk if you would like to meet at another time, he is happy to do so. 

 

Course Website:  The course website is located on eClass.  Be sure to check the website for important announcements, especially if you missed a class.  The course website contains required readings, and also contains many excellent resources to help further your success in this class.

 

Lecture Notes:  I will make every effort to post some PowerPoint slides on the website before class for you to use as a guideline during lecture if you desire.  This is done as a courtesy, and these are not meant to serve as a substitute for lecture!  The slides posted before class are not comprehensive, and there will be additions to the lectures slides used by me during class, as well as material covered not on the PowerPoint slides, so attendance at lecture is very beneficial.  Final PowerPoint slides will be posted on the website after the lecture.

 

Course Etiquette:  Your learning in this class depends upon a relationship of mutual respect with the       instructor and other students.  Please make every effort to make it to class on time.         However, I understand that situations arise that lead to tardiness, so if you arrive late, please make an attempt make as little noise as possible.  I’d rather you be late then not be there at all.  Also please remember to turn off your cell phones during class to avoid disruptions.  If you need to keep your phone on for emergency reasons, please turn it to vibrate or speak to me before class.           Some students may prefer to use a laptop to follow along and take notes during lecture.  However, I ask that you refrain from using your laptop for activities unrelated to class (e.g. Facebook, chat, etc.)  If this becomes an issue, I will amend this policy.  Also, if you choose to eat or drink during class, please do it quietly and respectfully.

 

Academic Integrity:  On November 18, 2008 the Faculty Senate approved a new college-wide policy on academic honesty.  This policy went into effect on January 5, 2009 with the courses offered during the January interim.  The policy is as follows:

 

            Academic dishonesty subverts the mission of the college and must be discouraged by application of a uniform college policy.  Dishonesty is defined as cheating, plagiarism, and falsification, which are explained on page 53 of the Undergraduate Catalog.  To discourage these types of activities the following sanctions will be imposed:

 

1. For an initial transgression, and where culpability is established, the student will face sanctions up to an including failure for the course.  The sanction will be determined by the course instructor.  In addition, a memo detailing the infraction must be forwarded by the instructor to the Registrar’s Office to be placed in the student’s file.

 

2. If the Registrar determines that this is the second infraction on the part of a student with fewer than thirty credits, the case will be referred to the Vice President for Academic Affairs before any action is taken.

 

3. If the Registrar determines that this is a second infraction on the part of a student with more than 30 credits, the penalty is immediate failure of the course.  The Registrar will inform the student and the instructor of the failing grade in the course.

 

4. A third infraction will result in dismissal from the college.

 

Dr. Merkhofer’s Policy:  Your grade is a reflection of your performance in this class, not a reflection of you.  However, cheating IS a reflection on you as a person and will make a lasting impression. If you look at or copy from another student, or assist another student during a quiz or exam you will receive a zero for that quiz or exam.  Depending on the severity of the infraction, the instructor reserves the right to give you an F for the course.

 

Students with Disabilities Policy:  I am happy to accommodate the needs of students with learning disabilities.  Students with documented disabilities needing academic adjustments are urged to contact the course instructor and the Coordinator of Services for Persons with Disabilities at (845) 569-3115 early in the semester (preferably within the first week of classes). All discussions are confidential.

 

Mount Saint Mary College Non-Discrimination Policy:  Mount Saint Mary College seeks to create and maintain a campus environment of mutual respect and tolerance which is free of discrimination and harassment. Mount Saint Mary College does not discriminate in its operations, programs and services on the basis of race, age, creed, national origin, gender or disability. Students who believe they have been discriminated against are encouraged to contact the Dean of Students, Room 115, in Hudson Hall.

Assessment:

The grading in this class will be broken down as following:

 

Lecture:                                                                         Lab:                                                                           

Exam 1:                                 15%                                 Lab Meeting:                      3%                                    
Exam 2:                                 15%                                 Research Project Poster:      8%

Exam 3:                                 10%                                 Lab Report Draft:                2%

Final Exam:                            15%                                 Lab Report Final:                 6%

Communicating Science Paper:   7%                                 Annotation report:               5%

Journal Clubs                            6%                                 Lab Notebook:                    5%

Quizzes/Homeworks                  3%                                Total:                                26%

Participation                             5%

Total:                                    74%

 

                           

Exams:  There will be three exams during the semester, including a partially comprehensive final exam.  The two highest exam grades will be worth 15% of your grade, your lowest exam grade will be worth 10%.  The final exam is worth 15% of your grade.  Absence from an exam is excusable only on the presentation of a certified excuse. Students are only permitted to make-up one exam during the semester (only allowed in extraordinary circumstances). Other missed exams will be recorded as a zero. In the case of a makeup exam, an oral examination may be offered. There are no makeups for missing the final exam.

 

'Journal Clubs':  Journal club will require students to read a primary literature article for discussion during class.  These discussions will focus on how the research was performed, what the purpose of the research was, the potential impact of the research, etc.  All students will be required to participate in journal clubs, not just the group presenting the paper.  There will be three journal clubs during the semester.  More information about journal clubs will be provided later.

 

Quizzes/Homeworks:  In this class there will be in class quizzes, some of these may not be announced beforehand.  These quizzes will be based upon the reading assignment for that day and material recently covered.  Missing a quiz for any reason will result in a zero for the quiz.  There may also be homework assignments that will be graded, based upon either lecture topics or the GEP project.  The instructor retains the privilege to not accept assignments not turned in on time. Some homework assignments may only be checked for completeness and will receive a cumulative grade for completeness. 

 

 

'Communicating Science Paper'An important part of science is the ability to communicate clearly with other people.  This writing assignment will involve the analysis of how science is communicated with the public, and you communicating science with other people.  More information in this will be provided later.

 

'Class Participation':  As this is an interactive class, there will be a class participation grade based upon the extent of your involvement in class.  This grade will include participation during lecture, as well as participation during journal article discussions, which will include presenting journal article data to the class. 

 

'Grading Scale'

 

                   93-100% = A                                         77-79.9% = C+

                   90-92.9% = A-                                      73-76.9% = C

                   87-89.9% = B+                                     70-72.9% = C-

                   83-86.9% = B                                        67-69.9% = D+

                   80-82.9% = B-                                      60-66.9% = D       

                                            Below 60% = F

 

 

 

Tentative Course Schedule

Note:  The instructor reserves the right to alter the following reading, lecture, and exam schedule.  Students are responsible for being aware of any changes in assignments or exam dates announced during lectures missed by the student.  Make sure you regularly check eClass for the updated course schedule, as well as detailed information regarding readings.

 

'Closing Hotline': The school does at times cancel classes for all or part of a day, usually due to bad weather. To find out if classes are running as usual, call the Mount's Weather Line at 845-569-3500 or go to the Course Cancellations Page http://cancel.msmc.edu/main/index.cgi/weather

 

The last day to add/drop courses from Traditional Spring Semester classes is'January 27th.'

 

 

Week

Date

Topic

Communicating Science

1

Mon 1/23

Introduction

 

 

Wed 1/25

Nucleic Acid Structure and Function

 

 

Fri 1/27

Review of Transcription

 

2

Mon 1/30

Eukaryotic Gene Structure

 

 

Wed 2/1

Eukaryotic Gene Structure

 

 

Fri 2/3

Chromatin

 

3

Mon 2/6

Chromatin

Mainstream Article Due

 

Wed 2/8

Epigenetics

 

 

Fri 2/10

Epigenetics

 

4

Mon 2/13

Epigenetics

 

 

Wed 2/15

Regulation of Transcription

 

 

Fri 2/17

EXAM 1

 

5

Mon 2/20

Regulation of Transcription

 

 

Wed 2/22

Regulation of Transcription

 

 

Fri 2/24

Regulation of Transcription

Mainstream Writeup Due

6

Mon 2/27

Post-transcriptional gene control

 

 

Wed 3/1

Post-transcriptional gene control

 

 

Fri 3/3

Post-transcriptional gene control

 

7

Mon 3/6

Non-coding RNAs

 

 

Wed 3/8

Non-coding RNAs

 

Fri 3/10

Non-coding RNAs

 

8

Mon 3/13

SPRING BREAK

 

 

Wed 3/15

SPRING BREAK

 

 

Fri 3/17

SPRING BREAK

 

9

Mon 3/20

Non-coding RNAs

 

 

Wed 3/22

Non-coding RNAs

 Primary Article Due

 

Fri 3/24

EXAM 2

 

10

Mon 3/27

Non-coding RNAs/Molecular Cloning

 

 

Wed 3/29

Molecular Cloning

 

 

Fri 3/31

Sequencing

11

Mon 4/3

Sequencing

 

 

Wed 4/5

Sequencing/Genetic Testing

 

 

Fri 4/7

Genetic Testing/Genomic Editing

 

12

Mon 4/10

Genomic Editing

 

 

Wed 4/12

BOOK CLUB

 Primary Article Draft Due

 

Fri 4/14

EASTER BREAK

 

13

Mon 4/17

EASTER BREAK

 

 

Wed 4/19

Genomic Editing

 

 

Fri 4/21

Stem Cells

 

14

Mon 4/24

EXAM 3

 

 

Wed 4/26

Stem Cells

 

 

Fri 4/28

BOOK CLUB

 

15

Mon 5/1

Stem Cells

Final Article Report Due

 

Wed 5/3

Mol Bio Cancer

 

 

Fri 5/5

Mol Bio Cancer

 

16

Mon 5/8

Mol Bio Cancer

 

 

Tues 5/9

REVIEW

 

 

 

 

Bio3530 – Molecular Biology and Genomics Lab

 

Biology is an experimental science. We will use the lab to explore and expand on some of the

concepts that we cover in lecture. The lab and lecture will work together to give students the

greatest possible exposure to the concepts, experimental approaches, and techniques of molecular biology.

Therefore you may see material on tests that was covered in the lab that relates to what we covered in lecture. Students should develop basic molecular biology laboratory skills as well and problem solving and analytical skills.

 

Semester Lab Project

The lab experience for the molecular biology course is going to be a semester-long project that will

have dry lab (computer) and wet lab components. We will start the course by using computer-based

applications in the analysis of genomic DNA (commonly referred to as genome annotation).

Subsequently, each group will design and carry out experiments to determine whether there is any

evidence that would support their computer based conclusions. This second part will use many of

the common techniques in the field of molecular biology, including techniques you may have used in microbiology.

 


The Genomics Education Partnership (GEP)

The field of modern genetics is generating data (particularly genomic sequence data) faster than it

can be analyzed. Computers are used to make a first pass at annotation of the genomic sequence;

that is, indication of the regions of interest – particularly genes. However the computers are prone to

mistakes – generally in order to make sure that they do not miss potential genes they predict genes

where none exist.  As part of a nationwide consortium of researchers, you will use tools, such as BLAST, FLYBASE and GeneFinder to annotate at least one contig of genomic DNA from Drosophila ficusphila, a species of Drosophia similar to melanogaster but has not had its genome annotated.  We will work as part of a larger research group that is annotating genomic sequence data, looking at the computer predictions and determining if there is sufficient evidence to support the gene predictions. The annotation that we generate will be subsequently made available to the research community, so is a part of an actual research project.  The findings in this report will be used for research publication on which students will be eligible to be co-authors, and the sequences will be submitted to the internationally used GENBANK database.  This component of the course will involve tutorials, homework assignments, a written report, oral presentation and presentation at the spring iROC poster session.

 

Investigating the Validity of our Gene Models

During the second part of the semester each group will pick one of their gene models and determine

if there is any evidence to support the gene model. We will use a variety of techniques that are

common tools of the molecular biologist, including RNA isolation, PCR, electrophoresis and

restriction digestion.

 

 

 

 

Assessment:

 

Lab Meeting:  In lab, you will be working on a continuous project involving both in silico and bench research.  You will be required to update the class on your progress during lab, about halfway through the project.

Research Project Poster:  At the culmination of research project, students will design a poster describing the results of their work.  Students will present this to the class, as well as at the iROC Poster Session on May 4th 4-6 PM.

 

Lab Report:  Students will write a lab report based upon the wet lab research they will be carrying out throughout the semester.  Students will be required to submit a draft of their report, as well as a final report.

 

Annotation report:  As part of the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), students must compile a report to submit their findings for their annotation and transcription start site analysis.

 

 

 

Tentative Lab Schedule

Week

Date

Annotation

Wet Lab

Journal Club

1

1/24, 1/26

Genomics - Introduction to Bioinformatics

 

 

2

1/31, 2/2

Genomics Annotation Project - Introduction to Annotation

 

 

3

2/7, 2/9

Genomics Annotation Project

 

 

4

2/14, 2/16

Genomics Annotation Project

Isolate RNA

 

5

2/21, 2/23

Genomics Annotation Project

Isolate RNA

6

2/28, 3/2

Genomics Annotation Project

DNase/Reverse Transcription

 Journal Club 1

7

3/7, 3/9

Genomics Annotation Project

Setup PCR

 

8

3/14, 3/16

SPRING BREAK

 

 

9

3/21, 3/23

Genomics Annotation Project/Lab Meeting

Run/Digest PCR product

10

3/28, 3/30

Genomics Annotation Project

Setup ligations

 Journal Club 2

11

4/4, 4/6

Genomics Annotation Project

Transformations

 

12

4/11, 4/13

Genomics Annotation Project

Analysis

 

13

4/18, 4/20

Genomics Annotation Project

 

Journal Club 3

14

4/25, 4/27

DNA DAY

 

 

15

5/2, 5/4

Posters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIO 3520

Spring 2017

Dr. Evan C. Merkhofer

MWF 10:10-11:05 AM

Aquinas 251/157

 

 

Agreement to classroom policies:

 

I have read the syllabus for BIO 3520 and understand and agree to all of its terms.  I understand the attendance and grading policies.  I agree to abide by the terms of the syllabus and the MSMC policies on academic honesty at all times.

 

 

__________________________________                           _____________

Print name                                                                                Date

 

__________________________________

Signature

 

 

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

 

Bio3520 –Information sheet

 

Name and Year:

 

 

Major:                                                             

 

 

Classes you are taking this semester:

 

 

 

 

Career goals:

 

 

 

 

Your favorite class at the Mount so far:

 

 

 

 

Topic in genetics and molecular biology you are most interested in: